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Graduate student summer course: Research Methods in Ocean Acidification at Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington (20 July - 22 August 2015, WA, USA)

20
Jul
2015

Ocean Acidification

(FHL 568 A, 9 credits)

Note: FHL 568 is listed with University of Washington as "Special Topics in Advanced Ecology and Biomechanics"

Session B: July 20 - August 21, 2015 (5 weeks)
 Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
 Arrive Sunday, July 19 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 21 after lunch.

Dr. Andrew G. Dickson
 Marine Physical Laboratory
 University of California
 adickson at ucsd.edu

Terrie Klinger
 School of Marine and Environmental Affairs
 University of Washington,
 tklinger at uw.edu

Jon Havenhand
 Dept. Biological & Environmental Sciences
 University of Gothenburg
 jon.havenhand at bioenv.gu.se
 
 The focus of teaching will be on interactive workshops and discussions of key issues, rather than traditional lectures (although there will be several of those too). Workshops and discussions will focus on critiques of key papers in the literature, which will be selected to present different viewpoints on key topics and engender debate. (As part of the course, you’ll be given guidance on the generic, and essential, skill of critically evaluating a scientific paper, and summarizing its content). In comparison to traditional lectures, this framework provides increased opportunity to anchor basic understanding and analysis methods, provides more flexibility to address key issues in the recent literature, allows us to tailor the content to material that is of relevance to your research, and is quite simply more fun.
 
 Laboratory exercises will focus on establishing sound laboratory practice, which is essential for chemical analyses, but also highly relevant – albeit sometimes neglected – for design and analysis of biological experiments. These exercises will form the foundations on which you’ll build your lab/field project in the second half of the course.
 

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

More info...

Application deadline extended: 18 February 2015